April 16, 2014

Tiara (In Two Parts), c.1810, France

(Source: collections.vam.ac.uk, via blackbastetofthewall)

April 15, 2014
inacom:

Statuts de l’Ordre du Croissant, fondé par René d’Anjou (1448). Date d’édition : 1401-1500 Type : manuscrit Langue : Français Format : Papier. - 65 feuillets. - 195 × 130 mm. - Reliure veau fauve, aux armes de Saint-Victor

inacom:

Statuts de l’Ordre du Croissant, fondé par René d’Anjou (1448). Date d’édition : 1401-1500 Type : manuscrit Langue : Français Format : Papier. - 65 feuillets. - 195 × 130 mm. - Reliure veau fauve, aux armes de Saint-Victor

(via medieval)

April 15, 2014
"He who delights in solitude is either a wild beast or a god."

— Sir Francis Bacon  (via thedeerandtheoak)

(Source: stxxz.us, via its-slinkyvagabond)

April 15, 2014
kendra-p:

"I’m going to have to eat every fucking chicken in this room." 

kendra-p:

"I’m going to have to eat every fucking chicken in this room." 

(via nosaur)

April 15, 2014
mapsontheweb:

1776 Map of New York City, highlighting the areas affected by the Great NYC Fire of 1776 in red

mapsontheweb:

1776 Map of New York City, highlighting the areas affected by the Great NYC Fire of 1776 in red

April 15, 2014

atlasobscura:

The Library of WaterStykkishólmur, Iceland

Known as “Vatnasafn” in the native Icelandic, the Library of Water is a long-term project that has set out to capture the spirit of Iceland through its waters, weather, and words.

Located in a former library building built on a coastal promontory, this long term installation is both an art piece and natural history collection. The piece consists of three distinct parts: One area collects audio recordings (accompanied by visual displays) of Icelandic weather as reported by the local people around the town of Stykkishólmur, where the exhibition is located, creating an interactive self-portrait of the area. Accenting this display is the floor of the main room which is made of rubber etched with both English and Icelandic words pertaining to the weather. The centerpiece of the site is the titular “Library of Water” which is kept in floor-to-ceiling clear cylinders. Each pillar standing throughout the main room is filled with water that was melted from one of Iceland’s 24 glaciers. Every tube holds the liquid of a single glacier, allowing visitors to take a sort of tour all across Iceland right in one room.

For more on The Library of Water, keep reading on Atlas Obscura…

Atlas Obscura’s Iceland Week is in partnership with Icelandair, the airline that can fly you to this unreal wonder and many others for surprisingly cheap!  

April 15, 2014
likeafieldmouse:

Alexandre Singh - The Oceans and the Land (2013)

likeafieldmouse:

Alexandre Singh - The Oceans and the Land (2013)

(via rarestofrare)

April 15, 2014
Word of the day: corvine

tedx:

oupacademic:

adj. Of or like a raven or crow, especially in color.

imageImage: Raven croak by Franco Atirador. CC-BY-SA-3.0 via Wikimedia Commons.

A little vocab for your Thursday. Pair your new verbiage with this very corvine TEDx Talk on the surprising intelligence of crows from avian researcher John Marzluff at TEDxRainier. Watch the whole thing here»

Bonus: Hacker Joshua Klein and his crow thought experiment at TED2008.

April 15, 2014
edwardspoonhands:

kawaiimistake:

xelethaine:

mori-girl-life:

Saying Hello to the Dragon.

That is a fucking forest spirit and nobody will make me believe otherwise.


Full image here

Crying

edwardspoonhands:

kawaiimistake:

xelethaine:

mori-girl-life:

Saying Hello to the Dragon.

That is a fucking forest spirit and nobody will make me believe otherwise.

image

Full image here

Crying

April 15, 2014

irelandseyeonmyth:


Knowth looks like something from the Lord of the Rings from the outside.

Inside its a neolithic passage tomb older and more technologically advanced than the pyramids at giza.



Knowth is aligned to the equinoxes something that would have taken an unusually advanced knowlege of astronomy and on a few days each year light used to travel up a narrow passage into the mound to illuminate a central chamber with big ‘basin stones’ shaped like cauldrons or alters. Today there is a large supporting wall put in to keep the structure intact so it doesnt happen.

Another unusually high tech feature is the corbelled roof, its is almost a perfect arch showing the builders were aware of the stresses and strains the roof would face and they built it so well using only stone materials and stone tools, without even using mortar that its lasted more than 5000 years and is still water tight. Despite the site being altered during various phases of occupation.

Knowth features in mythology as Cnogba, its linked with deities like Lugh, Aengus, the Dagda, Bui/The Cailleach and name might be related to the death of a goddess there or interestingly to the name for Hazel nuts (Cno) famously eaten there. Its interesting because it relates to the story of the near by river boyne.

The river came into the world from a well in the otherworld over hung by hazel trees. A salmon lived there and it got divine knowlege by eating the nuts that fell into the well. When the river entered our world the salmon swam down in to it and lived by the passage tombs until it was caught by Fionn who got divine inspiration from eating it.

The hazel nut had that role even outside myth, poets in medieval ireland called the struggle for inspiration ‘cracking the caill crimmon’ or cracking the hazel nuts. While we cant know what meaning the builders of knowth gave it. The story of the river and the hazel nuts might mean Cnogba was atleast a place associated with divine inspiration.

http://aclockworkireland.blogspot.ie/

(via kswaiyinspirations)